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  • Krishnan 04:22 on October 5, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    LiberKey applications work on Debian through Wine 

    There is this beautiful portable suite called LiberKey which is really a collection of hundreds of open source applications for Windows.

    For months, I have searched and tried out several portable applications for Windows. None of them even came close to LiberKey in terms of the range, stability and upgrades.

    I’ve used LiberKey from the same USB device on both XP and Vista machines with equal ease. You can update LiberKey on XP machine and run it on Vista and viceversa. In fact, I’ve copied LiberKey onto my “C:\Program Files” on Windows drives and I enjoy free updates of all my open source applications.

    What was a good Windows solution, has now proven to be a good Linux solution too.

    Today, I tried out several LiberKey applications on Debian through the Wine interface and most of them seemed to be working well. The only fall back is that these applications dont work through the Liberkey interface. But rather each application needs to be run from its folder manually. This is not a set back  as all it takes is a link to a application to open it.

    Debian users sure wont have to miss their little windows programs on GNOME or KDE.

     
    • TLSam 19:48 on October 9, 2009 Permalink

      LiberKey is a known GPL violator and trademark infringer. They’ve stolen code from PortableApps.com and lied about it when caught. They also repackage and modify things like Firefox without permission.

      You’re better off using PortableApps.com. They support open source software and do things legally. They also work with the Wine folks. Their menu works under Wine.

    • meh 16:16 on December 28, 2009 Permalink

      TLSam, accusing without proof is very serious. I’m not connected to Liberkey in any way, but it sickens me to see that Portable Apps users/developers are so keen to attack Liberkey, which is indeed a fine suite.

    • twitch 12:44 on March 16, 2010 Permalink

      I use Liberkey, it’s brilliant. I’ve been thinking about moving to PortableApps.

      If you can provide some proof please, TLSam

      -twitch

  • Krishnan 13:06 on September 27, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: disk-manager, fstab, NTFS   

    How to : Mount an NTFS drive for read-write in Debian Lenny 

    Traditionally, Linux users mount NTFS partitions for read-write by first obtaining the libfuse2 and ntfs-3g packages and then manually editing the /etc/fstab file. This process required you to remember several things tedious and there was a risk of making the system non-bootable if the /etc/fstab file was incorrectly written.

    Today, I was able to do the same thing with the help of a new module called disk-manage on Debian Lenny and Gnome.

    Disk-manager detects, mount new unmounted partitions, including NTFS-partitions in real time without requiring a reboot. Disk-manager  can be also used to set mount point for the partitions.

    To install disk-manager:

    # apt-get install disk-manager

    To start disk-manager

    System->Administration->Disk Manager

     
    • Joe Flyde 07:31 on October 8, 2009 Permalink

      Thx. just what I was looking for after my Debian install. Puppy Linux has an application that mounts drives. Was looking for one for Lenny. Last obstacle overcome, goodbye Microsoft.

    • Joe Flyde 07:35 on October 8, 2009 Permalink

      Love Linux. Wish I was bold enough 6yrs. ago when I first comtemplated the switch.

    • ahmed 02:21 on November 16, 2009 Permalink

      i couldnt handle the fuse and ntfs-3g method. this helped me a lot.
      thank you very much

    • MyDo 20:57 on January 15, 2012 Permalink

      Great thanks buddy! It works great and I say goodbye Windows ;-) ! At long last !!!!!

  • Krishnan 12:56 on September 27, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: su, sux, x authorisation   

    Howto: Manually assigning X authorisation for Debian superuser 

    Today, while running Debian I noticed that I was able to run some programs as a normal user. But when I logged in as a super user, the program wont run.
    eg:
    $ gedit starts gedit
    # gedit fails giving the following error
    ———————————————
    krishnanondebian:/home/krishnan# gedit
    No protocol specified
    cannot open display:
    Run ‘gedit –help’ to see a full list of available command line options.
    ———————————————-

    X authorisation for the superuser seems to be an issue that has been discussed several times. There is a sux command which is technically “su+x authorisation”. I didn’t know about the sux command so I took the longer route:

    1. open a console and login as ROOT : su

    2. see who can launch an “X program” : xauth list
    if you get an error or the list is empty(you dont get anything) then continue to read on-probably this is you solution.

    3. open a console and as USER see who is authorized to open the X programs : xauth list
    This should give you something like this :
    desktop/unix:0 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 395a5228d995d958a0cc59a5afe9d521
    193.5.93.21:0 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 45891337dd1f30ea26f45bb6b70449b0
    desktop:0 MIT-MAGIC-COOKIE-1 370116e6e873fc798aa4f1429f536219

    4. now as ROOT add the ones (hostnames) you want to be able to launch X programs on your DISPLAY :

    xauth add desktop/unix:0 . 395a5228d995d958a0cc59a5afe9d521

    Do the same for the other entries as well(if you want to be able to launch from other hosts too-try adding all if you dont know which one is the correct one).Notice that the long numbers at the end are the same with the users before!ALSO NOTICE THE DOT “.” between the “desktop/unix:0″ and the number. Now you should be ok.Try to launch the program as ROOT. Should work

    Source  : http://ubuntuforums.org/archive/index.php/t-166863.html

     
    • lefty.crupps 18:15 on September 28, 2009 Permalink

      > ALSO NOTICE THE DOT “.” between the
      > “desktop/unix:0″ and the number.

      And where do we ge these numbers or how do we generate them or know what one to use?

  • Krishnan 02:34 on September 23, 2009 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Debian, squeeze   

    Howto: Upgrade to Debian Squeeze 

    My first attempt to upgrade to Debian Squeeze failed. It was because I lost power in the middle of the upgrade and my PC got switched off. It was so bad that I could not get the installation to work again. I had to re-install.

    I made a second attempt today and succeeded. Briefly, this is what happened.

    18:45 hrs
    I pop in the Debian 5.03 DVD 1 and start a vanilla install of Lenny with GNOME.
    20:35 hrs
    Debian Lenny  installation completes.
    20:40 hrs
    I edit the /etc/apt/sources.list file to change all instances of “lenny” to “squeeze” and all instances of “.in” to “.us”. This is the only preparatory step required. Nothing else is necessary as the entire squeeze installation happens by a download.
    20.41 hrs
    I use the update manager to check for updates. Smart Upgrade feature  identifies 1101 packages adding to 881 MB.
    20:42 hrs
    I begin to download the squeeze upgrades on my 512 KBPS connection
    12:58 hrs
    All 1101 package downloads complete and squeeze installation starts. Thankfully, I didn’t lose power this time.
    01:25 hrs
    Installation freezes when attempting to restart the hardware abstraction layer.
    01:27 hrs
    After waiting for two minutes, I press Enter a few times and Ctrl+c a few times. Disk whirls and installation continues.
    01:35 hrs
    Installation completes. Update Manager throws out a long list of dependency problems reproduced below. PC freezes again and wont power down.
    01:36 hrs
    I manually power down the machine, wondering if the upgrade worked
    01:38 hrs
    When I boot, I notice that the Vanilla installation of Squeeze is near perfect. Everything works flawlessly.

    The addition of  multimedia drivers, third party software etc. are for another day.

    ————————————————————-
    Dependency problems during a normal squeeze install.
    ————————————————————-
    E: dbus: subprocess installed post-installation script killed by signal (Interrupt)
    E: dbus-x11: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: gconf2-common: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgconf2-4: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: gconf2: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnomevfs2-common: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnomevfs2-0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnomevfs2-extra: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libedataserver1.2-11: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libcamel1.2-14: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libebook1.2-9: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libecal1.2-7: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-evolution: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnome2-common: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: gvfs: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnome2-0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libbonoboui2-0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnomeui-0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libpanel-applet2-0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-gnomeapplet: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnome-desktop-2-11: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-gnomedesktop: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: gnome-media-common: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgnome-media0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-mediaprofiles: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: metacity-common: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libmetacity-private0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-metacity: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libtotem-plparser12: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-totem-plparser: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-gnome2-desktop: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-gconf: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: python-gnome2: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: consolekit: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: policykit: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: hal: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: xserver-xorg: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: xserver-xorg-core: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: xserver-xorg-input-kbd: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libebackend1.2-0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libedata-book1.2-2: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libedata-cal1.2-6: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libegroupwise1.2-13: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libsoup-gnome2.4-1: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgweather-common: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgweather1: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libedataserverui1.2-8: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libexchange-storage1.2-3: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgtkhtml3.14-19: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: libgtkhtml-editor0: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
    E: evolution-data-server: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured

     
  • Krishnan 07:48 on September 20, 2009 Permalink | Reply  

    Howto: Automatically start a program in Debian 

    Some times, some of us may need to start a program when starting Debian. One example could be the instant messenger program Pidgin or it could be Vuze for people who want their downloads to start automatically.

    GNOME has an elegant solution for this. Go to System -> Preferences -> Sessions and here you can add a list of programs you want to start with every session.

    *Edited later*

    In KDE4 there is a similar choice in Control center -> autostart.

    If you are using KDE 3.5, which comes with Debian Lenny as a default, you will need to add the program manually to ~/.kde/Autostart

     
    • MavFurious 02:16 on September 21, 2009 Permalink

      It’s not correct, in kde4 there is a similar voice, in control center, autostart.

    • Rares 03:15 on September 21, 2009 Permalink

      Yes, KDE4 does have an option in systemsettings-> advanced -> autostart.

    • Krishnan 13:46 on September 21, 2009 Permalink

      I appreciate the input on KDE4.
      Personally, I’ve never tried KDE4 on Debian. I have edited to clarify that what I wrote applies to KDE3.5 which comes with Debian Lenny by default.
      Thanks again.

    • R S Chakravarti 19:05 on September 21, 2009 Permalink

      I have Debian Squeeze on my home desktop, including KDE4. How to make kpackage work?

      KDE3.5 worked really well and 4 is a disaster!

    • alind 14:53 on September 22, 2009 Permalink

      in fvwm-crystal you can put that in ~/.fvwm-crystal/preferences/Startup

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